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African Centre for Coastal Palaeoscience

We from the African Centre for Coastal Palaeoscience would like to extend a warm welcome to our newest associate, Dr Lynne Quick - palynologist, who will soon be calling Nelson Mandela University her home.

Dr. Erich Fisher, Dr. Simen Oestmo and Prof. Curtis Marean, from the ACCP, and co-authors published their findings on how humans thrived during the Toba eruption 74 thousand years ago. Click here to read the article


Dr. Hayley Cawthra, Dr. Erich Fisher and Prof. Curtis Marean, from the ACCP, and co-authors published their findings on the depositional and sea-level history on the southern continental shelf of South African in the Quaternary Science Reviews. Click here to read the article


Dr. Charles W. Helm, from the Peace Region Palaeontology Research Centre, and co-authors including Dr. Jan. C De Vynck and Dr. Richard Cowling, from Nelson Mandela University, as well as Prof. Curtis Marean and Dr. Hayley Cawthra, from the ACCP, published their findings on recently discovered giraffe tracks in coastal aeolianites east of Still Bay, South Africa. Significant conclusions about prehistoric conditions and vegetation can be drawn from this discovery. Click hear to read the article


Dr. Charles W. Helm, from the Peace Region Palaeontology Research Centre, and co-authors including Dr. Jan C. De Vynck, from Nelson Mandela University, and Dr, Hayley Cawthra, from the ACCP) published their findings on fossilised avian trackways in the Palaeontologia africana journal. Click here to read the article


Irene Esteban and co-authors including Dr. Richard Cowling, from Nelson Mandela University, and Prof. Rosa M. Alberta and Prof. Marion Bamford, from the ACCP, published their findings on the first quantitative and morphological study of phytoliths from the Greater Cape Floristic Region. Click here to read the article


Annette Hahn and co-authors including Dr. Hayley Cawthra, from the ACCP, published their findings on how the anticyclonic circulation in the Southern Hemisphere drives oceanic and climatic conditions in the Holocene southernmost Africa. These new results suggest that the coincidence of humid conditions and cooler sea surface temperatures along the south coast of South Africa resulted from a strengthened and more southerly anticyclonic circulation. Click here to read the article


Alberto Collareta and co-authors including Prof. Curtis Marean, from the ACCP, published their findings on Cetopirus complanatus form the late Middle Pleistocene human settlement of Pinnacle Point 13B in Mossel Bay, South Africa. Click here to read this article


Prof. Richard Cowling, from the ACCP, and co-authors explain the evolution of the longitudinal gradient in Cape plant diversity at the hand of Levyn’s Law. They published their findings in Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa. Click here to read the article


D.L Roberts and co-authors including Dr. Hayley Cawthra, Dr. Frank Neumann, Prof. Richard Cowling and Prof. Marion Bamford, from the ACCP, published in Global Planetary Change. This multi-proxy study provided new insight into fluvial deposition, ecosystems, phytogeography and sea-level history during the late Paleogene-early Neogene. Click here to read the article

 

Dr. Hayley Cawthra, from the ACCP, and co-authors published their contributions on the pronounced climatic/oceanographic gradients around the southern African coastline. Click here to read the article

 

A warm, heartfelt congratulations to Dr. Jan C. De Vynck who was awarded his PhD in Oceanography (Biological) (unconditional acceptance) on 19 April 2018.

 

The Palaeoscape III workshop which took place in the winter of 2017 yielded interesting findings as the palaeoscientists continued to pursue the knowledge of how exactly the first people to think like us experienced the world.

 

Reporter Nicky Willemse interviewed NMMU's Honorary Professor Curtis Marean and Distinguished Professor Richard Cowling and had this to say... (click here)

 

Researchers and students from NMMU’s new Centre for Coastal Palaeoscience (CCP) attended and presented at the 39th annual Fynbos Forum, held in Port Elizabeth from 25-28 July.

Jan de Vycnk, an NMMU PhD candidate in the CCP, and colleagues have published the first results from the coastal foraging project in the Journal of Human Evolution. Click here to read the article.

 

NMMU student, Jan de Vynck, has published the findings from his Masters research in PeerJ. Click here to read the article.

 

The Coexistence Approach is a widely used method for reconstructing past climates. The authors highlight a string of theoretical problems with this approach and suggest alternative methods that will provide more robust reconstructions. The full text of this paper is available from here.

 

NMMU recently took a proverbial leap into the future through the benefits of interdisciplinary research as it explores the mysteries of yesteryear.